Featured post

Contact Me for Appointments Only

To all my patients around the world, you can leave a message in this post (IN THE COMMENT SECTION ) or using the CONTACT FORM provided above the car image, with your email. (A TODOS mis pacientes alrededor del mundo que quieran ponerse en contacto conmigo para hacer una cita médica, dejen un mensaje con su correo electrónico en este blog en la FORMA DE CONTACTO provista arriba de la imagen del carro o en la SECCION DE COMENTARIOS . Seriedad absoluta porfavor. Gracias.



Thought of the Day: I am Intelligent….and Disorganized!

Are you a disorganized person? Good news: you are intelligent! Well, that is what a scientific study tells us, known us Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) conducted by the University of Georgia.
Please, have in mind that “being disorganized” does not mean having your  house, room or office upside down, lol.

Since I was a child I had to deal with disorganization problems. I made myself to do things in an organized manner, but it was and still is a constant fight; but now I have found a magnificent and important reason to explain the way I behave, and it is simple: I am intelligent.

However, I don’t think that people who are well-organized are NOT intelligent,  au contraire.  I am just happy to have found 9 reasons to excuse my disorganization traits…and I have them all!


1.  They Are Extraordinarily Creative.

2. They Have Difficulty Maintaining Focus On Things That Bore Them.

3. They Are “Addicted To Insight”.

4. They Have A Wide Variety Of Interests.

5. They Tend To Lose Track Of Time.

6. They Are Visionaries Who Often Score In The Gifted Range On Verbal IQ Tests.

7. They May Appear To Be “Geeks” Or “Know-It-Alls” To Others.

8. They Develop Strong Attachments To Often Unrelated Things And People.

9. They Want To Be Around High-Energy People.

Read more about 9 Reasons…
TTCT University of Georgia
Gifted Education

Beauty In Nature All Over The World…and in Your Soul!

“Just living is not enough… one must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower.” — Hans Christian Andersen
“You can drive out nature with a pitchfork but she keeps on coming back” —Horace (65-8BC)
“Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better” —Albert Einstein

ABOUT the last image of Colombia: the Caño Cristales river features no fish at all, probably because it is so filled with coral and aquatic plants.





Travel Around The World

Delicious Messy Fun Food of the Day and Some Funny Quotes

My therapist told me the way to achieve true inner peace is to finish what I start. So far today, I have finished two bags of M&M’s and a chocolate cake. I feel better already.
– Dave Barry

Red meat is NOT bad for you. Now blue-green meat, THAT’S bad for you!
– Tommy Smothers

Food should be fun – Thomas Keller

Seafood Stew in Half a Grilled Pineapple!

Grilled Flank Steak with Chimichurri Butter

Shrimp & Gnocchi with Parmesan Cream Sauce.

A Messy Red Velvet Ice Cream Cone for a Messy Dessert!

Winter Ends Today Spring Begins Tomorrow

Today is the last day of winter 2017-2018, but many places in the world still show majestic blankets of snow.  And that is because the traditional start of spring is governed primarily by hours of daylight, not the weather. And the traditional start of spring is, essentially, Groundhog Day, even back in history before that furry prognosticator’s tradition was coined.

Although it is hard to feel like spring has begun in some sub-zero temperatures places, the length of day drives a change in weather, and together both drive plants to come out of dormancy.

In southern California From January 1 to January 31 the sun rose a little earlier each day, rising about 8 minutes earlier at the end of the month than at the beginning. From February 1 to February 28, the sun rose about 37 minutes earlier. In March, from start of month to end, the sun will rise an extra 40 minutes earlier.

March 20, the Mid-Spring Equinox, marks the point at which the lengthening days have finally caught up with the waning darkness, and daylight and nighttime are of equal length.

The daffodil (narcissus bublocodum) is the traditional flower of hope and spring as it drives up through the snow in response to lengthening days of February and March.



Beauty in Nature Morning Walk

“Nothing is quite beautiful alone: nothing but is beautiful in the whole. A single object is only so far beautiful as it suggests this universal grace.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson


Post of the Week: 7 Golden Rules of Blogging, with 3453 Likes in 9 hours!

I’ve been following and reading a number of blogs for over five years now. I remember this blog by a Romanian journalist; I would spend hours reading the posts, the comments — oh, the comments were so funny and great. It was quite addictive. He got an insane number of comments, and I was jealous […]

via The 7 Golden Rules of Blogging — Cristian Mihai

Recipe of the Day Yummy Food: Argentinian Flanked Steak

I love to travel all over the world, and love to try the food of each country I visit, their culture and their wine. Argentina has great food and their steak is delicious. A steak a week is an easy pull in Argentina. Argentine cattle are grass fed (in contrast to more common grain-fed beef typical in the U.S.). As a result, Argentine beef is not only a better taste experience, but also an easier digestive experience. To boot, Argentine steaks are charcoal grilled on a parrilla (i.e. a giant grill, also the word used to denote grill restaurants).

So I let me share with you with yummy steak grilled and spiced to perfection for your palate to enjoy and savor!


  • 1 (2 1/2 pound) flank steak, trimmed
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 pound fresh spinach, washed and drained, stems trimmed
  • 4 small thin carrots
  • 4 large hard boiled eggs, peeled and quartered lengthwise
  • 1 cup large pitted green Spanish olives, halved lengthwise
  • 1 large onion, sliced into rings
  • 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 (750 ml) bottle dry red wine (recommended: Argentine Malbec)
  • 1 head garlic, halved
  • 1 large onion, halved
  • 1 handful fresh thyme sprigs
  • 1 handful fresh oregano sprigs
  • 2 bay leave


Butterfly the steak by slicing lengthwise and opening it up like a book. Pound the meat gently with a mallet to flatten and even out the thickness; rub all sides with olive oil and generously season with salt and pepper.

With the steak lying lengthwise, scatter the spinach leaves evenly over the surface of the meat, leaving a 1-inch border all around. Arrange the carrots in long rows across the steak, about 2 inches apart. Put the egg strips and olives between the carrot rows. Scatter the onion rings and cheese over the filling, sprinkle with salt and red pepper flakes. Carefully roll the meat up over the filling, from bottom to top, into a long thick cylinder (jellyroll-style.) Tie with butcher’s twine to hold it together, as you would a roast.

Coat a large Dutch oven or pan with olive oil and put over moderate heat. Lay the stuffed steak in the hot oil and sear until browned on all sides, 5 to 7 minutes. Pour in the wine and enough water to come up almost to the top of the meat. Toss in the head of garlic, onion, and herbs to flavor the broth. Cover, and slowly simmer on medium-low heat until the meat is fork-tender, about 1 1/2 hours, turning the meat over once halfway through cooking. Taste the broth before serving and adjust spices, if necessary.

Transfer the matambre to a cutting board and let rest for 15 minutes. Remove the kitchen strings and cut crosswise into 1-inch slices ¿ the colors of the filling will look absolutely gorgeous spiraled in the steak. Spoon some of the sauce over the meat and serve. Matambre is good hot, room temperature, or cold.